Just a Little Further

On the Road to Aus…and back again

The tiny town of Aus is only a few miles east of the wild horse herd and since we were in the neighborhood, we thought we’d drive a little further to check it out. The word “Aus” in German translates to “out”. But then, the Khoi-Khoi word translates to “place of the snakes”. Hmm … perhaps this really wasn’t a place we wanted to visit? Ah, but we did.

aus_info center

Aus was an internment, “prisoner of war”, camp after the Germans surrendered to the South African troops in WWI. We traveled along a bumpy, gravel road to view the war memorial and the ruins of the site.

war memorial

Ruins of the camp buildings built by the prisoners themselves were still visible. Crumbling foundations, rubble and detritus were all that remained of the site where 1550 German soldiers were held in captivity for four years (1915-1919).

ruins

Returning to the little town of Aus, we found that Aus isn’t much at all. The tourist info office, which we’d heard good things about, was closed. There’s a scenic little church, St. Theresa’s, at the bottom of the hill by the railroad tracks. Aus is the end of the line for the train which primarily is used for ore movement.

st theresas

Further up the road there are a few odd camping sites and a self-catering accommodation and then there is the Bahnhof Hotel. Truth be told, this was the reason we’d come to Aus. The Bahnhof Hotel restaurant offers a fine luncheon menu, but it is particularly well known for its sumptuous variety of cakes … and after all … it was David’s birthday.

david with chocolate cake

After a filling lunch followed by coffee and cake, we waddled to the car and started back for Lüderitz. We noticed the gravel road turn-off for Klein Aus Vista with a very inviting entrance and since we still had plenty of day left, we decided to do a bit of exploring. We hadn’t gone far before a gate with a cattle guard stopped us. The sign just said to close the gate behind us. We continued on. What was the fence keeping in or out?

opening the fence

The circuitous road turned and twisted and dipped and finally straightened and stretched out with the desert all around us. Ostrich, wild horses, springbok and oryx all grazed peacefully together.

animals grazing together

Up ahead in the distance, we saw a car … a very old, rusting hulk of a car … a 1934 Hudson Terraplane, to be exact. It seems there’s an interesting story associated with this old car that goes something like this. The two thieves who owned the car stole diamonds from the Sperrgebiet (Forbidden Diamond Area) and were chased into canyon by the Diamond Detectives, who shot them dead. There are bullet holes in the car door to prove it. The diamonds, however, were never recovered. It is said that on moonlit nights, the thieves haunt the Geisterschlucht (Ghost Canyon) still hunting for their diamonds. No sign of ghosts or diamonds, but this car in the middle of nowhere was cool.

1930s hudson terraplane

We could hear birds chirping nearby and finally figured it was coming from a huge sociable weaver nest in a camel thorn tree. I was somewhat tentative about standing directly underneath the nest considering the number of occupied weaver apartments above me. The birds quieted and were not at all sociable while I stood there. They were, however, most courteous and dropped no bombs while I photographed.

sociable weaver nest

We retraced our track out of the canyon and as usual, saw things differently on the return trip. The expanse of desert seemed more vast from this perspective. A beautiful gabar goshawk patiently stood sentry, perched high  in a tree ready to swoop down for an afternoon munch if the opportunity presented itself.

gabor goshawk

We saw an albino oryx grazing with his more colorful kin and wondered if being “different” in the animal world posed as many problems as it did in the human world.

albino oryx

Back on the B4 to Luderitz, we passed by an abandoned house, situated along the railroad line that no longer runs to Luderitz. Constant sand on the tracks and repair issues caused termination of the service a decade ago. It was to resume in 2009. So far, still no train to Luderitz. TIA!

old abandoned house

We arrived back in Luderitz in early evening. The sun had dipped below the horizon and the glow of a fine day lingered over the pier as we dinghied back to Nine of Cups.

sunset at the dock

 

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  • Benjamin Gass

    Happy birthday David!! I am glad you got to have your cake and eat it, having had such a special day!
    You both always find interesting things in unusual places, and have peaked my interest to travel further North of the border than what I have previously considered.
    We will join you both again soon!
    Benjamin and Belinda

    • Marcie

      Hi Benjamin & Belinda … great to hear from you. Best part of David’s birthday from my perspective is that I get to eat cake and celebrate, too. Like 2 birthdays in one year! Would love to see you two in Namibia … not so far away … in fact, it’s just a little further!

  • Dana Cunningham

    I love the last three posts. just started following your blog. Namibia has always been high on my list but time and cost have kept me away. thanks to you i can now nibble on a virtual appetizer. Thank you

    • Marcie

      Hi Dana,
      This is our second visit to Namibia … the first was by land in 2007. Arriving anywhere by sea is always a whole different experience. We’d never visited Luderitz before though … it’s quite isolated which makes it all the more charming and interesting. Thanks for coming along with us … we enjoy the company.
      Cheers …. Marcie & David